Restaurants, Restaurants

The Perfect Excuse for Fried Fare: Thanksgivukkah in Los Angeles and New York

November 18, 2013

Photo courtesy of goodiesfirst on Flickr Creative Commons

LOS ANGELES and NEW YORK, US – There’s a new term circulating for the holiday phenomenon coming up next week: Thanksgivukkah. It’s the first time that the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah (which begins this year at sundown on November 27) and Thanksgiving (November 28) will overlap. The holiday’s start date changes every year due to the fact that it’s determined by the Hebrew calendar. In any case, what this means is that on Thanksgiving, Jewish families will not only be reaching for the sweet potatoes but also for the potato latkes!

Latkes are, of course, potato pancakes fried in oil. The tradition of eating fried foods (donuts are popular choices too) at Hanukkah symbolizes the “miracle of the oil” that the holiday commemorates. (As the story goes, a small flask of oil was only supposed to keep the flame lit in the ancient Holy Temple in Jerusalem for one day, but it miraculously lasted for eight days.) Here are some of our favorite places in New York and Los Angeles to find Thanksgivukkah-appropriate fried indulgences.

Los Angeles:
Canter’s Deli
This historic Jewish deli in the Fairfax district is Thanksgivukkah heaven. Not only do they serve a “Thanksgiving meal” daily (turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce), but the crisp potato pancakes, served with applesauce and sour cream, are also a menu mainstay (you can order them as an appetizer in the adjoining Kibitz Room bar).

Farmers Market
There are a number of ways to celebrate oil at this multicultural food bazaar just south of Canter’s on Fairfax. Get your fried fix with a to-die-for donut from Bob’s Coffee & Doughnuts or by way of the Middle East with some crispy falafel at Moishe’s. You can also opt for all-American grease with deep-fried zucchini at Du-par’s retro diner.

New York:
EAT
This Upper East Side deli from Eli Zabar (gourmet grocer) elevates traditional Jewish dishes to upscale cafe fare. That means you can get your potato pancakes two ways: either with humble applesauce or accompanied by chichi caviar. Don’t pass up the jelly donut from the bakery for the full fried experience.

Katz’s Delicatessen
Claiming the title of New York’s oldest delicatessen, this Lower East Side establishment is well-known for its famous pastrami, but its potato latkes, served with sour cream or applesauce, are also enduring favorites. And they serve an annual Thanksgiving dinner, too, which combines traditional turkey and trimmings with Jewish specialties (hello Thanksgivukkah!).

Norma’s
Breakfast gets a New American foodie makeover at this popular brunch spot in Le Parker Meridien (think foie gras brioche French toast). So it’s no surprise that the potato pancakes here get dressed up in style with homemade cranberry applesauce and sweet carrot payasam. Sounds like a Thanksgivukkah breakfast for sure!

Read more about these venues in our Los Angeles Guide and New York Guide.

Canter’s Deli
419 N. Fairfax Ave.
Los Angeles, CA
(1) 323-651-2030
Website
Map

Farmers Market
6333 W. 3rd St.
Los Angeles, CA
(1) 323-933-9211
Website
Map

EAT
1064 Madison Ave.
New York, NY
(1) 212-772-0022
Website
Map

Katz’s Delicatessen
205 E. Houston St.
New York, NY
(1) 212-254-2246
Website
Map

Norma’s
Le Parker Meridien
118 W. 57th St.
New York, NY
(1) 212-708-7460
Website
Map

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